google.com, pub-5769274547049626, DIRECT, f08c47fec0942fa0

If you’re like most people, the first day of your exercise routine is always a little bit hard. 

You might feel a little bit sore and you might wonder why you always get headaches the first day I start an exercise routine.

But don’t worry – this is completely normal! 

In this blog post, I will discuss the reasons why you get headaches when you start working out and how to fix them. 

I’ll also give you some tips for avoiding them in the future. 

So read on to learn more!

Why do I always get headaches the first day I start an exercise routine?

Headaches are a common side effect of starting a new exercise routine. A headache might be the result of dehydration from working out. It’s possible that you’re not eating enough before your workout. You might need to adjust your exercise routine to better fit your body and needs. Besides, the type of exercise you’re doing could be causing your headaches. Take breaks if you start to feel lightheaded or dizzy. You should ease into your new routine gradually to avoid any pain or discomfort. Remember to talk to your doctor if you continue to experience headaches after starting an exercise routine.

1. Headaches are a common side effect of starting a new exercise routine

One of the most common side effects of starting a new exercise routine is getting headaches. This is completely normal and nothing to worry about! In fact, it’s actually a sign that your body is adapting to the new activity.

When you start working out, your body releases endorphins – these are hormones that make you feel good and can help to relieve pain. However, they can also cause headaches in some people.

2. A headache might be the result of dehydration from working out

If you’re working out and you start to get a headache, it might be because you’re dehydrated. This is especially common if you’re doing a lot of sweating. When you sweat, you lose fluids and electrolytes – these are essential for keeping your body hydrated and functioning properly. If you don’t replace them, you can start to feel dizzy, lightheaded, and even get headaches.

So how can you prevent dehydration-related headaches? The best way is to make sure that you’re drinking plenty of fluids before, during, and after your workout. A good rule of thumb is to drink eight ounces of water for every 20 minutes of exercise. You can also try drinking sports drinks or eating foods that are high in electrolytes, like bananas or coconut water.

Why do I always get headaches the first day I start an exercise routine?

3. It’s possible that you’re not eating enough before your workout

If you’re not eating enough before you start working out, it’s possible that you’ll start to get headaches. This is because your body needs fuel in order to exercise properly. When you don’t eat enough, your blood sugar levels can drop and this can lead to headaches.

So how can you make sure that you’re eating enough before you work out? Try to eat a small snack or meal that is high in carbohydrates and protein. Good options include fruit, whole-grain toast, yogurt, or peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

4. You might need to adjust your exercise routine to better fit your body and needs

If you find that you’re getting headaches every time you start exercising, it might be because your body isn’t used to the activity.

This is especially common if you’ve been inactive for a while or if you’ve recently started a new exercise routine. In this case, it’s important to listen to your body and make sure that you’re not overdoing it.

Start by slowly adding in new exercises or activities.

For example, if you’re just starting to run, start with a few minutes each day and then gradually increase the amount of time that you’re running.

If you’re lifting weights, start with lighter weights and increase the amount as you get stronger. It’s also important to make sure that you’re warm up before you start exercising and cool down afterward. This can help your body to adjust more easily to the new activity.

5. The type of exercise you’re doing could be causing your headaches

In some cases, the type of exercise that you’re doing could be causing your headaches. For example, if you’re doing a lot of cardio or high-intensity interval training (HIIT), this can sometimes lead to headaches.

This is because these activities can cause your blood pressure to rise and this can lead to headaches in some people. If you find that this is the case, try doing a different type of exercise or scale back the intensity of your workout.

6. Take breaks if you start to feel lightheaded or dizzy

If you start to feel lightheaded or dizzy while you’re working out, it’s important to take a break. This is especially true if you start to experience a headache.

If you push yourself too hard, you might make your headache worse. So how can you tell if you’re pushing yourself too hard? Pay attention to your body and how it feels. When you start to feel dizzy, lightheaded, or nauseous, it’s time to take a break.

7. Ease into your new routine gradually to avoid any pain or discomfort

If you’re starting a new exercise routine, it’s important to ease into it gradually. This can help you to avoid any pain or discomfort that might lead to headaches. Start with lower intensities and shorter duration workouts and then gradually increase as your body gets used to the new activity.

You should also pay attention to how your body feels during and after your workout. If you start to feel any pain or discomfort, it’s important to stop and rest. Pushing yourself too hard can lead to injuries or even headaches.

Furthermore, make sure to stay hydrated during your workout. Drink plenty of water and avoid dehydration. Dehydration can cause headaches, so it’s important to make sure that you’re drinking enough fluids.

Finally, don’t forget to eat a healthy diet. Eating a balanced diet can help you to avoid headaches and other health problems. Make sure to eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. And limit your intake of processed foods, sugar, and salt.

What Happens To Your Body When You Start Exercising Regularly | The Human Body

8. Talk to your doctor if you continue to experience headaches after starting an exercise routine

If you’re still experiencing headaches after trying these tips, it’s important to talk to your doctor.

They can help you to rule out any other potential causes of your headaches and provide additional treatment options.

In some cases, they might recommend medication or physical therapy such as massage or acupuncture.

Final thoughts

Don’t let headaches stop you from starting an exercise routine. With a little bit of planning and preparation, you can avoid headaches and get the most out of your workout. 

Follow these tips, you’ll be on your way to a healthy and active lifestyle.

Remember – it’s important to listen to your body! If you start to feel dizzy, lightheaded or get a headache while you’re working out, stop and rest. Drink some fluids and make sure that you’re eating enough.

If the headache persists, it’s best to consult a doctor.

They can help you rule out any other potential causes and give you advice on how to proceed.

We use cookies to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. View more
Cookies settings
Accept
Privacy & Cookie policy
Privacy & Cookies policy
Cookie name Active

Privacy Policy

Who we are

Our website address is: https://myexerciseroutines.com.

Comments

When visitors leave comments on the site we collect the data shown in the comments form, and also the visitor’s IP address and browser user agent string to help spam detection. An anonymized string created from your email address (also called a hash) may be provided to the Gravatar service to see if you are using it. The Gravatar service privacy policy is available here: https://automattic.com/privacy/. After approval of your comment, your profile picture is visible to the public in the context of your comment.

Media

If you upload images to the website, you should avoid uploading images with embedded location data (EXIF GPS) included. Visitors to the website can download and extract any location data from images on the website.

Cookies

If you leave a comment on our site you may opt-in to saving your name, email address and website in cookies. These are for your convenience so that you do not have to fill in your details again when you leave another comment. These cookies will last for one year. If you visit our login page, we will set a temporary cookie to determine if your browser accepts cookies. This cookie contains no personal data and is discarded when you close your browser. When you log in, we will also set up several cookies to save your login information and your screen display choices. Login cookies last for two days, and screen options cookies last for a year. If you select "Remember Me", your login will persist for two weeks. If you log out of your account, the login cookies will be removed. If you edit or publish an article, an additional cookie will be saved in your browser. This cookie includes no personal data and simply indicates the post ID of the article you just edited. It expires after 1 day.

Embedded content from other websites

Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, articles, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the exact same way as if the visitor has visited the other website. These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content, including tracking your interaction with the embedded content if you have an account and are logged in to that website.

Who we share your data with

If you request a password reset, your IP address will be included in the reset email.

How long we retain your data

If you leave a comment, the comment and its metadata are retained indefinitely. This is so we can recognize and approve any follow-up comments automatically instead of holding them in a moderation queue. For users that register on our website (if any), we also store the personal information they provide in their user profile. All users can see, edit, or delete their personal information at any time (except they cannot change their username). Website administrators can also see and edit that information.

What rights you have over your data

If you have an account on this site, or have left comments, you can request to receive an exported file of the personal data we hold about you, including any data you have provided to us. You can also request that we erase any personal data we hold about you. This does not include any data we are obliged to keep for administrative, legal, or security purposes.

Where we send your data

Visitor comments may be checked through an automated spam detection service.

Home Work Out Guide

Six-part guide covering all aspects of exercising at home

Newsletter

Save settings
Cookies settings